Wilt Chamberlain, and The Debate Between Nozick and Rawls

In his book, "Anarchy, State, and Utopia", Robert Nozick offers the Wilt Chamberlain thought experiment in order to demonstrate how a conception of justice based on “end-state patterned distributions” (as he put it) would require constant coercive interventions on the part of the state, in order to maintain the desired pattern. This, in turn, would undermine theories of justice that incorporated liberty into their framework. John Rawls’ theory of justice is one such example. I will briefly outline the thought experiment and the problem it poses, consider some objections to Nozick, and conclude that despite these objections, Nozick succeeds.

Justice, Culture, and the Inheritance of the Enlightenment

A question is posed to me via my coursework: "Does justice require that anything be distributed equally? If so, what?" This is, of course, the bog-standard prompt for the student to explain the modern dispute between John Rawls1 and Robert Nozick2 . We'll get there shortly, but first I want to back up and ask … Continue reading Justice, Culture, and the Inheritance of the Enlightenment

A Critique Of The US Declaration Of Independence

When in the Course of human events, it becomes necessary for one people to dissolve the political bands which have connected them with another, and to assume among the powers of the earth, the separate and equal station to which the Laws of Nature and of Nature's God entitle them, a decent respect to the … Continue reading A Critique Of The US Declaration Of Independence