Aristotle 101: Hylomorphism And The Soul

Is the theory of hylomorphism a "middle way" between the view of living things as purely material (where life is a sort of emergent property, dependent on atoms of matter), and dualism (the view that the body is is the dependent "copy" of a Platonic Form)? If so, how successful is it at navigating that path?

Aristotle 101: The Soul And The Faculty of Perception

According to Aristotle, the eyes are an organ of the body meant to inculcate the soul with the capacity for perceiving the forms of shape and color. If one recalls that Aristotle's theory of the soul is mean to account for the kinds of change that a living body undergoes, and that change is the transition from potentiality to actuality, then the question becomes, how do the eyes enable this kind of change? This essay will briefly summarize Aristotle's general theory of sense perception, provide a specific account for sight, and then raise some concerns about the efficacy of this theory in the context of Aristotle's theory of causes.

Exiting The Cave, The Podcast Edition

Introduction Welcome to the first episode of "Exiting The Cave". My name is Greg. I am an amateur philosopher, studying philosophy part-time at the University of London, in their International Program. My "day job" is in tech, but my passion is philosophy. In case you're not familiar with it, I have been writing a philosophy … Continue reading Exiting The Cave, The Podcast Edition

A Stream of Consciousness On Metaphysical Realism

The following notes are an attempt at outlining my basic thought process, to document my progress in the study of metaphysical realism, and offer the reader some food for thought. I offer it, as is. If there are any actual arguments in this post, it is purely by accident. If there are any answers to … Continue reading A Stream of Consciousness On Metaphysical Realism

Plato, Parmenides, and the Theory of Forms – Part 3

Depending on the author, and the level of complexity of the analysis, some parse Parmenides’ case into four objections, some five, and some six. For the sake of limiting the difficulty of this post, I’ll be taking the four objection approach, clustering the minor ones in where they make sense. I’ll go through each of Parmenides’ objections as they occur in the course of the dialogue, and considering whether he’s sufficiently refuted Socrates.

Plato, Parmenides, and the Theory of Forms – Part 2

In this installment of the series on Plato's Forms, we'll have a brief look at the major conceptions of the theory, some of the key differences, and dig deep into the one formulation Plato seems to have favored the most. For those of you looking for a thorough discussion of Parmenides' refutations, you'll have to wait until the last installment. In keeping with the principle of the first post, the idea here is to just try to understand the theory itself, and the problem it was trying to solve, before we make any move to object to it.

London School of Philosophy – Summer School Conference

I decided to spend three of my vacation days on the London School of Philosophy's "Summer School" conference, this week. The theme of the conference was "Philosophy: Past, Present, and Future", and the talks focused heavily on the broad questions like the nature of philosophy, it's role and purpose in society, it's place in history, … Continue reading London School of Philosophy – Summer School Conference

The Sorites Paradox – Maybe It’s Not What We Think It is.

It has been asked how, if at all, one might resolve the Sorites paradox. I am not convinced a solution is possible, and in this paper I will explain the responses I have become aware of, and why they fail. In the end, I will conclude that there is no solution to the paradox, but … Continue reading The Sorites Paradox – Maybe It’s Not What We Think It is.